What Nobody Ever Tells You About Presenting

Most likely, you’ve heard this advice: people buy from people they trust. The interesting thing is: what do they buy?

The decision to purchase works for tangible and intangible items–across the board. It’s not just for products and services. People buy other things based on trust. Specifically, they buy into advice, ideas, recommendations, and suggestions from those who they know and believe.

What makes you believable to people who don’t know you already? A well-structured story.

Your story is the backbone of your presentation. But here’s the part most experts won’t reveal. How to build a story that is real, solid, and true. How to structure your story to engage any audience-even if you’re short on time and only have minutes to share your ideas.

The ‘how’ of storytelling is absolutely crucial in business presenting. If you tell a story that is authentic, you are very believable. People in your audience pay attention, get curious and want to hear more. Even if you’re just meeting for the first time, people feel that you are trustworthy…and they are interested in doing business with you.

If you tell a story that doesn’t make sense, doesn’t feel authentic, people will have the opposite response. They might not know exactly why. But something just doesn’t fit.

This leads people to feel things like:

“Something is off.”

“What he said just didn’t ring true.”

“I felt like there was a piece missing.”

What’s the result of this? People feel skeptical. They get picky about little things. They may be consciously or unconsciously suspicious. They question everything. Not only your story…but also your words, your background, your expertise, and your recommendations.

In other words, things take a long time and may not move forward. This is not what you want to achieve in interviewing for a job, initiating a consulting job, or sealing a sale.

A strong story is like the spine of any presentation. You may be presenting your bio, your background or your consulting project. Perhaps you’re presenting the story of your company, research or training program.

Many executive coaching clients have asked me, “what are the key building blocks for a great story?”

Here’s the short answer. Whatever the topic, organize so your story makes sense for your audience. Appeal to their sensibilities with these 8 building blocks.

1. Grabs Attention from start to finish. Instant connection is the secret to outrageous success.

2. Builds Credibility with tangible evidence. From news coverage to press releases to testimonials, share what other people have said about your business.

3. Deepens Interest by providing clear benefits for the audience.

4. Demonstrates Creativity for solving troubling problems and achieving compelling goals.

5. Ignites Desire with a magnetic pull of emotions. Reach deep to find core emotional connection with your audience because people want to do business with people who truly understand them.

6. Confirms Authentic sense that you, your company and your solutions are ‘the real deal.’ People want to get involved with people who are committed and genuine.

7. Shows Care for your audience. This is vitally important. People want to feel, hear and see that you care deeply about what matters most to them.

8. Inspires Action and decisions. Whether your purpose is to educate, inform, present or sell–action is the ultimate outcome.

Structure your business materials and presentations around these 8 elements, and your story will have power. Plus, there’s an added personal benefit. You’ll feel confident, at ease and ready for last-minute presentations.

Imagine the power. A well-built story will boost your business…and your bottom line.

With a logical and creative structure to your story, every presentation is much more powerful. This adds a rush of fresh energy for interactive presentations. The best part? You and your team will feel a boost in confidence…and see a boost in your bottom line results.

Well-Orchestrated Christmas Presents For Your Boyfriend

Each year, boys are thinking over what types of Christmas presents to send to their girlfriends. On the other hand, what presents that girls should give to their boyfriends? Regrettably, Girls seldom think of it. But love is a mutual relationship, and in addition to receive love, girls should also think of showing love to their boyfriends. So it is time to pick out one memorable Christmas gift for your boyfriends.

Third:Links of London

Today, jewels are not only the best friends for girls, but the boys are also fond of Links of London. The glamour of Links of London is so hard to resist. A pair of lovers’ necklaces, mobile ornaments or rings is an excellent idea on Christmas day. The boy wearing a necklace of the same style with the girl’s is the best declaration of the two persons’ intimate relation. The delicate and unique design of Links of London jewelry makes Christmas gifts more memorable. I’m afraid that your boyfriend will surely cherish it.

Second: NBA jersey

As we know, the majority of boys are infatuated with NBA. They further own their favourite team. So it is wonderful to present him a personalized NBA jersey especially with the autographs of their favourite NBA player, isn’t it?

First: iPhone

Boys are never tired of electronic products. With the fast speed of upgrading of electronic products, they always have a desire for the latest ones. iPhone is a good choice. And you can also share it with your boyfriend to use the same style of iPhone. Such a behavior will greatly increase the closeness between lovers.

OSRAM – The Five Components of an Effective Presentation – Part 5 of 5 – The Message

How do you give an Effective Presentation?  What makes the difference between an average presentation and an effective presentation? This is Part 5 of 5 focusing on The Message.

There are five main components of an effective business presentation. The acronym OSRAM should help you to remember them and help you to light up your audience. The five components are:

  • The Objective
  • The Speaker 
  • The Room 
  • The Audience
  • The Message

You should consider each of these components in turn to maximise the effectiveness of your presentation. Neglecting any individual component can ruin an otherwise successful presentation. Put them together correctly and you will turn on a light in people’s heads; brighten up their lives; get your audience to see and understand things, about which they were previously in the dark.

This series of articles looks at each of these components in turn and discover what needs to be done to ensure the success of that component.

The Message

Last but by no means least of the five components of an effective business presentation, is your message.  It is surprising where the time goes to when you get up and start talking. In a 30 to 45 minute presentation, you have only time to get across three main to points.

Keep it simple!  If you cannot state your central message in one or two sentences, you probably have not narrowed your topic enough, or clarified your thoughts enough.

  • Decide on three key points.
  • Develop supporting evidence for each key point. Include statistics, stories or examples.
  • Develop a strong introduction and powerful conclusion with a call to action.
  • Use visual aids, which help to communicate your message.
  • Perform the presentation with enthusiasm, variety and passion.

I have 3 golden rules for making your presentation memorable:

  1.  Never let them get ahead

This first rule is more about ensuring people listen rather than making it memorable, however if your audience don’t listen in the first place they are very unlikely to remember anything. As soon as your audience gets ahead of you and thinks that they know what you are going to say next, they will stop listening. After all, why bother listening if you already know it?

How can your audience get ahead of you?

The classic way is if you put up a slide with 5 or 6 bullet points and start talking your way down the list. While you are on the first point they will have read them all and will be ahead of you. Another classic is giving out handouts of the slides before the presentation. Everyone is likely to read ahead, to see what you will be talking about and will already have decided if you might be worth listening too, even before you stand up to speak.

  2.  Just Do It  

My second rule comes from a saying by Confucius:

  • I hear – I forget
  • I see – I remember
  • I do – I understand  

While this may not always be true, after all there are some things you hear that you will never forget, I think the general gist is true.

Take driving to a new location as an example. The first time you go you need to look at the map to see how to get there but if you drove their one day you can invariable drive their again later without looking at the map. However if you were a passenger on the first trip and then have to drive there yourself another time, you will probably need to check the maps again. This is because when you drove you actually did it and understand where the location is, when you were a passenger you just heard and saw but didn’t really understand where you were going.

What has this to do with presentations? If you really want your audience to understand what you are talking about you need to get them to do things. Either physically or mentally. Make them think, ask them questions, get them to participate, not just sit and listen.

Take them on a journey where they imagine using all their senses, describe what it looks like, what it sounds like, what it smells or tastes like and what it will feel like to do something.

3.Do it in threes

For some reason that I can not explain, the human brain remembers three things better than it does two or four. Politicians and advertising executives have used this in speeches and in advertising for thousands of years.

  • Vini Vidi Vici (I came, I saw, I conquered) – as Caesar said.
  • Grace Pace Space - Jaguar’s tagline in the 50′s J
  • Just Do It - From Nike

The tag line “Just Do It” is not “Just get on with it” or even “Do It” which logically you may think would have more impact and be more memorable. It is “Just Do It” because of the rule of 3. 

However, it does not even have to have just 3 words as long as the rhythm is right: “The Best 4×4 by Far” – from Landrover works because the way it is said has three phrases “The Best , “4×4“, “By Far“.

I apologise that the above examples have a very British flavour to them, but thinks of tag lines from your favourite vendors are I’m sure many of them will be in “threes.”

When you cannot do it in three, then use 5 7 or 10. Groups of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 9 are not recommended, as they are less memorable.  Do not ask me why, they just do not work as well. I suppose that is why we have a top ten, and not a top six or top nine.

Politicians, leaders and advertising executives all use the rule of three. Now you know about it, look out for it.  You will be surprised how often it is used. As you can see from the examples above another favourite memory technique is to use alliteration. Combing the rule of 3 with some alliteration is particularly powerful.

  • Location, Location, Location – the great rule of property
  • Education, Education, Education – what this country needs according to New Labour

So have three benefits at the end of your presentation, it will be easy to say, sound better and be more memorable.